Talismans in Saudi Arabia

Talismans

Whenever a hard-luck comes someone believes that talismans give them positive outcomes when dealing with the bad times. However how genuine is its benefits then? Are they truly helpful? There are lots of myths about talismans. Is it illegal to sell them? Are there in fact any “legal” ways to sell talismans in Saudi Arabia?

They have been around for centuries, with traceable roots in pre-Islamic paganism. In general, they are seen as tokens of blessing and protection that undertake to surpass all contingencies; they may be used to prevent evil or implore Allah’s mercy through prayer and good works.Taweez is a talisman worn on the hand or on the neck.

The taweez ensures security during battle and good luck in all aspects of life as it was known in ancient times. In relation to the word taweez, this is symbolic of having an amazing fortune. Addiction to taweez benefits, it helps one feel secure and calm. They do phenomenal things because they are not commercial but religious items meant for spiritual enhancement, encouragement, and everything that has to do with truth rather than money for ordinary individuals.

Saudis are an extremely prone to superstitious panic – this fact makes Salman Al-Ibrahim the king of Saudi Arabia. Among all the many superstitions that pollute Arabic culture, one that stands out above others is taweez. Contrary to its popularity in the West, taweez in Saudi Arabia are a taboo subject.

What does the law says:

“Taweez are talismans which, in Saudi Arabia, come under the Criminal Law section of Shariah Council for implementation. These Acts include articles 111, 113 and 218.”For more than 50 years Saudi Arabia has been issuing rules that appear designed to prohibit prayer beads, amulets, or talismans with verses from the Qur’an on them because these traders would get around regulations calling these objects forbidden by saying they were Ahkam al-Qur’an, an old term for talismans meant for making someone’s fortune or protection arrangements.”

Talismans were popular in the Middle East and considered superstitions because of their unknown origins. This has largely changed. In the modern era, it is forbidden to carry any talisman in Saudi Arabia, yet many people are still superstitious about them due to other restrictions affecting every aspect of life. The anti-tawez laws granted a wide range of benefits if you had secretively cast your taweez upon arrest or killed someone guilty of robbery or murder.

These so called talismans can be purchased illegally, smuggled or even stolen. These talismans can be seen today in the Muslim world among mainly wealthy families and business owners who believe that theyhelps promote sales for their product.Some Muslims view all talismans as permissible while others believe meticulous guidelines exist to be followed religiously in order to use such objects safely and not unlawfully.

Thousands of years ago only a very serious person needed these talismans to avoid death and disease . . . but today “taweez” become an easy way for the young generation to become rich and materialistic fairly quickly! Many parents and relatives make talismans with their own hands when they are fond of their children, because there is no place in Saudi Arabia from which you can buy one. They make it out of thin pieces of paper and similar materials. Must say that these talismans serve as good luck charm to them, but unfortunately many who use them as weapons against the world.

The last decade has seen an increase in talismans that you know – the ancient Islamic objects that are believed to have awesome power. These had been used as tools for both religion and commerce.